Blackshaw’s Favourite Horror Movies

If you’re stuck for ideas of what to do with yourself this Halloween, Blackshaw has two outstanding suggestions to help you out.

First, come to see our production Halloween Tales on the 30th, 31st October and 1st November. Get your tickets now!

Then, once you’ve been to see Halloween Tales, and scared yourself silly, have a super spooky movie marathon with these TERRIFYING suggestions from our cast and crew.

1) Ellie Pitkin, Director of Halloween Tales, picks: Insidious 

via edgeoftheplank.com
via edgeoftheplank.com

Most terrifying moment: All the stuff with  the baby monitor

Why it’s her favourite: Ellie says, “It’s full of classic  jump moments as well as an actual plot – plus it has all my favourite horror story things: ghosts, children, possession and ghost hunters.”

 

2) Duncan Gates, writer of Fetch, picks: The Ring

via huffingtonpost.com
via huffingtonpost.com

Most terrifying moment: The entire last ten minutes

Why it’s his favourite: It’s lo-fi, downbeat, oddly un-demonstrative, with a terrific ebbing undercurrent of ‘OH GOD WHAT IS THIS EVEN ALL ABOUT’, which lasts through the ENTIRE film and makes the real world seem even more terrifying afterwards

 

3) Writer M.J. Starling, performer in Halloween Tales reading ‘The Whistling Room’, picks: ALIEN

Via http://geekshizzle.com/
Via http://geekshizzle.com/

Most terrifying moment: Ripley, unarmed and in her underwear, realising she’s not alone on the shuttle.

Why it’s his favourite: It’s a classic haunted house story … IN SPACE. And what CAN’T be improved by adding “IN SPACE”?

 

 

 

 

4) Bethany Arnold, Blackshaw’s Events Manager for the Howling Halloween Party, picks: Sleepy Hollow

via youtube.com
via youtube.com

Most terrifying moment: Aside from the fact that Bethany’s mum showed her this film at the tender age of 7, when the little boy is under the floorboards and his mums head rolls on the floor and he can see it looking at him, and then he’s trying to stay silent but the horseman realises he’s hiding and starts hacking at the floor. (I think we can all agree, this bit’s horrifying).

Why it’s her favourite: Although it’s horrible (and scarred her for life), Johnny Depp is awesome.

 

5) Rosie Marsh, actor playing the part of Ally in Fetch, picks: Dumbo

via filmwerk.co.uk
via filmwerk.co.uk

Most terrifying moment: When Dumbo gets drunk and all the clowns go all pink and psychedelic and start floating around him laughing. Rosie knows that Dumbo isn’t strictly speaking a ‘scary movie’ but she makes a good point

Why she really doesn’t like it: Rosie says, “how is that a kids film?!? It’s terrifying, I thought he’d never escape from them! Couldn’t sleep for weeks. I now hate clowns and floating pink things.”

 

6) Nicole Locke, Blackshaw’s Administrator, picks: Fright Night (not the David Tenant re-make)

via electricshadowsfilmblog.wordpress.org
via electricshadowsfilmblog.wordpress.org

Most terrifying moment: When Jerry is hiding in Charley’s room, and then jumps out to threaten him

Why it’s her favourite: The marvellous 80’s special effects, particularly towards the end when a fake bat swings across the room.

 

 

 

7) Alex Yaghma, actor playing the part of Col in Fetch, picks: 28 Days Later

via superstarfantasyblog.wordpress.com
via superstarfantasyblog.wordpress.com

Most terrifying moment: When they are being chased up a tower block staircase by rage infected zombies

Why it’s his favourite: Alex says, “something about being chased and hunted really freaks me.”

 

 

 

 

8) Siobhan Whelan, Blackshaw’s Publicity, Press and Marketing Manager, picks: The Blair Witch Project

via movie666.com
via movie666.com

Most terrifying moment: ALL. THE. GIGGLING. CHILDREN.

Why it’s her favourite: Siobhan says, “despite it being a bit over now, it still absolute scares the pants off me. If I see piles of sticks anywhere, I assume death is imminent.”

 

 

9) Bryony Tebbutt, actor playing the part of Vic in Fetch, picks: Saw

via cinemablend.com
via cinemablend.com

Most terrifying moment: *Spoiler Alert* When the guy saws off his foot, and the “dead” guy wakes up.

Why it’s her favourite: Bryony says, “When Saw first came out it was a great original idea, and the story captured me, then at the climax of the film, when this happened, was so shocking and heartbreaking it has always stuck with me.”

 

10) Vikki Weston, Blackshaw’s Strategy and Planning Manager, picks: The Shining

via whatculture.com
via whatculture.com

Most terrifying moment: The Grady Twins. Always.

Why it’s her favourite: Besides the incredible soundtrack, what’s most brilliant about The Shining is that it’s really about a normal bloke going completely insane. Which is totally chilling.

So, whether we’ve inspired you to movie marathon your way through Halloween or not, do yourself a favour and get a ticket for Halloween Tales now!

Send us your Flash Fiction & Micro Stories

‘For sale: baby shoes, never worn’ – Ernest Hemingway

At first, just a sentence. At closer inspection, deeply sad. Think on it more, and you can create an entire story around those words. All from one sentence; just six words. This phenomenon is known as ‘flash’ or ‘micro’ fiction.

Traditionally stories composed of less than 300 words, flash fiction has become even more compact for Twitter, with many writers challenging themselves to compose stories within the 140 character count.

Sometimes the greatest horror is that left unseen, so we wondered if that left unsaid could send chills up the spine.  With some research we were pleased to see that the internet already had this covered! Ghoulish stories of two sentences are being written across the world – see some of the best here.

As you can see from these examples, and from Hemingway’s tragic sentence above, the best micro-stories work by letting the reader fill in the gaps. And so, with Halloween Tales on the horizon, we wondered if you could freak us all out a bit with your own efforts by composing your very own micro-horror-story and sharing it with us on Twitter and Facebook – we’ll share and retweet the best efforts!

And in the spirit of participation, I’m willing to embarrass myself with my own poor effort:

She noticed his reflection in the mirror behind her and smiled. Then she came to her senses and remembered why he couldn’t be there.

We’re all looking forward to reading your efforts!

 

Siobhan – PPM Manager