Blackshaw Arts Hour – Episode 91

  • Matt reviews Ant Man & The Wasp/The Spy Who Dumped Me
  • The Scare Slam – it’s a-comin’! Apply to take part. Tickets now on sale.
  • We play a taste of what you can expect from the Scare Slam – a piece from last year’s show, The Fatberg of Whitechapel by Reece Connolly
  • We chat about Blackshaw’s mates, Non Zero One and their brilliant project, Put Her Forward
  • It’s that time again – Victoria Sadler’s round up of female playwrights at off-west end London theatres this year (Spoiler – representation is still a bit rubbish, boo!)
  • The penultimate episode of Black Shuck – Art and Martha heard a seal, and then a pair of glowing, spooky, eyes appeared – but turned out to be the lights of the boat – drop off secured, Martha was left alone…until the dog turned up…so where is Art? And is that dog, just a normal dog?!

Listen to the podcast here:

Relevant Links

Ant Man & The Wasp – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5095030/?ref_=nv_sr_1 

The Spy Who Dumped Me – https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6663582/?ref_=nv_sr_1 

The Scare Slam Tickets – http://bit.ly/ScareSlam2018

The Scare Slam, apply to take part – http://blackshawonline.com/whats-on/ 

Non Zero One: Put Her Forward – http://putherforward.com/ and http://www.nonzeroone.com/projects/put-her-forward/ 

Victoria Sadler:  2018 Theatre in Review: Challenges for Female Playwrights Continues –  http://www.victoriasadler.com/2018-theatre-in-review-challenges-for-female-playwrights-continues/ 

 

Blackshaw Arts Hour – Episode 80

  • Matt reviews Pacific Rim Uprising
  • Strat & Alex do Art returns!  This time, they’re painting eggs (sure…)
  • Ellie saw ’42nd Street’  – what did she think?
  • Matt saw ‘The Great Wave’ – what did he think?
  • Matt and Ellie have a chat about the latest series of ‘Merely Roleplayers’  – they’re in the Wild West – listen to some clips (and then binge the series!)

 

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Useful Links

Pacific Rim Uprising – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2557478/

42nd Street – https://42ndstreetmusical.co.uk/

The Great Wave – https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/the-great-wave

Painting Eggs – dragon fun – https://twitter.com/DragonsofWales?s=08

Merely Roleplayers – https://merelyroleplayers.podbean.com/

Blackshaw Arts Hour – Episode 79

  • Matt reviews ‘Annihilation’ and ‘Tomb Raider’
  • Ellie gives a spoiler-free rundown of ‘Hamilton’ (which she done saw on Monday)
  • We chat about the Writing Workshop we’re running – FREE Writing Workshop for Wandsworth residents aged 16+ on Sat 12 May, 2-4pm, Putney Arts Theatre. The workshop will cover the discipline of writing, creating narrative, writing for radio, and can offer support for starting writing, or works in progress.
  • A reminder you can get discounted tickets for The Final Adventure of Frankie Fightwell, until 1st April!
  • Shows Ellie and Matt are seeing soon: Miss Julie at the National, Good Girl by Naomi Sheldon at the Trafalgar Studios, 42nd Street (featuring Lulu!), and The Great Wave (also at the National)

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Relevant links:

Frankie Fightwell tix – http://bit.ly/FrankieFightwell 

Free Writing Workshop – http://blackshawonline.com/blog/announcement-free-writing-workshop/

Annihilation – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2798920/?ref_=nv_sr_1

Tomb Raider – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1365519/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 

Good Girl – http://www.atgtickets.com/shows/good-girl/trafalgar-studios/

42nd Street – https://42ndstreetmusical.co.uk/ 

Miss Julie – https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/julie

The Great Wave – https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/shows/the-great-wave

 

Blackshaw Arts Hour – Episode 74

Ellie, Matt and Vikki are in the studio for the first time in 2018!

  • Matt reviews Pitch Perfect 3
  • Strat & Alex do Art – Limericks (oh dear…) – tweet us your limerick and we’ll RT our faves
  • We talk about Timeout’s ’18 shows to see in 2018′
  • Wandsworth Arts Fringe 2018 is open to applicants until 2nd Feb – get involved!
  • Merely Roleplayers is half way through Season 2 – catch up with the hijinks.

 

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Limericks by Strat

While listening to the show yesterday,
They reviewed Fifty Shades of Grey.
Matt didn’t find it a thriller.
He found it rather vanilla.
Which I didn’t expect him to say.

We thought we’d do something real smart,
A high-brow, intelligent part.
We wanted a section,
That was utter perfection.
But we got Strat and Alex do Art.

When Matt’s recording, sat on his tushy,
There’s something you can’t, but he can see.
If you hear him mutter,
Or stumble or stutter,
He’s distracted by Ellie’s pussy.

 

Limbericks by Alex

Two jokers attempting to art
Its hard to tell them apart
Laughing and playing
Don’t know what they’re saying,
I’m just glad I’ve not used the word fart
The Matt Boothman film review
Fancy a listen? Pull up a pew.
This man knows words in a way thats absurd
So much its hard to eschew
Working alongside a cat
Can be hard, there’s fairness in that.
This fluffy ball of fur does more than just purr,
She also eats loudly, the twat.
I’m not an old man from Kent
My nose isn’t terribly bent
These Stereotypes are silly and shite
And not at all what is meant
Tentatively approaching a task
Trying not to get caught up too fast
Being tactful and deft wanting emotional heft
But knowing its already been done in the past

Related Links

Pitch Perfect 3 – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4765284/?ref_=nv_sr_1

Limerick – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limerick_(poetry)

18 shows in 2018 – https://www.timeout.com/london/theatre/london-theatre-shows-not-to-miss-in-2018

WAF 2018 – http://www.wandsworthfringe.com/get-involved/take-part-in-waf

Merely Roleplayers – https://merelyroleplayers.podbean.com/

The Blackshaw Arts Hour – Episode 67

In exciting time news, the Blackshaw Arts Hour will be moving slots on Wandsworth Radio – we’ll now be airing on Tuesdays at midnight (i.e. the midnight between Tues and Weds!).  We’re hoping to welcome new listeners amongst shift workers and insomniacs.

 

As always though, the show is available as a podcast to listen to, anytime you damn well please!

 

In this episode, Ellie and Matt are in the studio, and the following is jam-packed, and headed to your ear holes:

  • Review of Darren Aronofsky’s film, ‘Mother!’
  • The concluding convo about ‘Angels in America’ at the National (with Sinead!)
  • Excitement builds for this year’s Scare Slam, and we take a look back at last year’s terror extravaganza
  • Discussion of the current environment for female playwrights in London
  • Chat about other ladies in the theatre world (including the RSC’s upcoming all-female Director lineup, and the casting of a lady in the role of ‘Bobby’ in ‘Company’).

 

Come on in, the podcasting water is lovely…

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Relevant Links

Victoria Sadler Article

http://www.victoriasadler.com/2017-in-review-the-lot-for-female-playwrights-worsens/

2016 Scare Slam

RSC Directors

Casting a woman as ‘Bobby’ in ‘Company’

London Horror Festival 2017

Scare Slam 2017 Tickets

The Blackshaw Arts Hour – Episode 61

Ellie and Matt are back on the proverbial horse, bringing you an ‘unplugged’ episode packed with film reviews (Wonder Woman, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2, FF8, Snatched, A Dog’s Purpose), chat about the latest TV sensation, ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, Matt’s thoughts on the first part of ‘Angels in America’ at the National, the return of Edinburgh Fringe Roulette, and some interruptions from Ellie’s cat.

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Children of the Sun – Art vs. Science vs. Reality

While children starve in the streets and disease sweeps through the town, Protasov (the scientist) focuses on trying to unpick the fabric of life and existence in order to make the world a better place. But how long will it take? Andrew Upton’s version of Maxim Gorky’s Children of the Sun has raised some interesting questions about progression and patience in an unstable society.

We have now become so accustomed to turning on the news in the morning to hear about the latest cuts to education, welfare and NHS that we are facing a strange austerity fatigue. Do we revolt? No. Do we protest? Yes, occasionally…when it directly affects us…if we can be bothered. This play forced me to reflect on some of the tired arguments that are on loop within the arts, science and the media. Children of the Sun is set against a society which is crumbling leaving the disenfranchised masses with no food, no fuel and no future. How long can they wait for scientists and and artists to improve their lives before they lose their patience?

Our protagonist is a scientist who has married well and lives in an impressive house where he can lock himself away from reality. Surrounded by middle class companions his emotionally starved wife, Yelena , who plays second fiddle to his scientific exploits chooses to have an affair with an artist, Vageen. It is an unusual trio but is made stranger by the fact that this house also houses his childhood nanny and his mentally unstable sister, Liza. This weird household is paid visits by rivaling siblings Boris who is hopelessly in love with Liza and Melaniya who desperately besotted with Protasov. The lust and rivalry that ensues is probably the only light hearted thing about this play, and even that is riddled with heartbreak and despair.

Protasov and Vageen have long debates about the virtues of art versus the ideals of science. Liza struggles with their bourgeois discussions and constantly tries to remind everyone that the world outside is changing and that the days of plenty are nearly over. Her screams of reality fall on deaf ears. As it turns out their complicated love-lives, artistic endeavours and scientific advances are not putting food on the plate of the starving masses. Superstition is rife amongst the villagers and when a chemical leak from one of Protosov’s tanks is thought to have poisoned a woman our characters are dramatically dragged into real life and their problems are painfully put into perspective.

Granted the play cannot be directly linked to our present situation, but it should serve as a stark warning to a government that seems to want to play chicken with our quality of life. Children of the Sun brutally demonstrates how unpredictable society can be if there is nothing left to lose.

When it comes to funding new research my preference is for science to get first dibs. I think even my most arty friends would agree that science and medicine is vital for our survival. Since we have been witness to the plentiful nineties and austere noughties I think it is clear that the art thrives when well funded and creates huge revenue for our economy (which seems to have been completely ignored by our philistine of a chancellor) but if funding is cut it can still get by and produce incredible results. With unrelenting support from audiences and an intrigue to learn, art is innate to humanity. Blackshaw is a prime example of this.

– Nick

Children of the Sun by Maxim Gorky in a new version by Andrew Upton. Directed by Howard Davies at The National Theatre, London.